Heber C. & Vilate
Kimball Home

LOCATION: Munson and Partridge streets

Heber Chase Kimball was born in 1801 and Vilate Murray Kimball  was born in 1806. They married in 1822 and joined the Church in 1832 along with their close friends, Brigham and Miriam Young.  Heber was ordained an apostle in 1835 and was frequently away on Church business. Through their many trials, they expressed joy and gratitude for God’s blessings.

Experience the Kimball Home from your computer or smart phone in three different ways: with our Virtual Tour,  Image Gallery, or schedule a  Live Video Tour. Click on the links below to see more.
 

Virtual Tour

Take a look inside the Kimball house right from your computer or smart phone by checking out our 360° Photos. Click on the links during the tour to continue through the house.

Image Gallery

Peek inside the Kimball Home as you scroll through our image gallery.

Kimball Home
Heber and Vilate Kimball purchased this lot in 1841 after Heber returned from a mission to England. They first built a log home and began construction on this larger brick home in 1845. It was completed within six months, but they were only able to live in it for about three months before they left Nauvoo with the Saints in February 1846.
Front Door/Hallway
The Kimball home was the first restored in Historic Nauvoo. Heber’s great-grandson, Dr. J. LeRoy Kimball, purchased the dilapidated property in 1954 with the intent to restore it as a summer home. However, so many people toured the home during its dedication in 1960 that LeRoy hired tour guides instead. He later helped establish Nauvoo Restoration Inc., a nonprofit that gradually acquired and restored multiple properties that are now part of Historic Nauvoo.
Parlor
The parlor features portraits of Heber and Vilate (pronounced va-lāte), as well as some period furnishings. Articles in this room are not original to the home, but some of them belonged to the Kimball family when they lived in Utah, including the mantel clock and fireplace screen and irons.
Parlor
Study
Heber served as a missionary twice in Great Britain between 1837 and 1841 and was instrumental in bringing thousands of new members to the Church. While he was away, he and Vilate wrote many letters to each other; this room features copies of two of those letters (visible in the virtual tour).
Study
While this piano is not original to the home, it is a reminder that many Latter-day Saints played instruments and considered music to be an integral part of life.
Dining Room
After moving to the West, Heber spent many years engaged in temple building and temple work. It is fitting, then, that one of original Nauvoo temple plates commissioned by Lucius Scovil in 1847 hangs in the dining room (by the window). As an Apostle, Heber taught that the temple is the ultimate source of revelation. He worked on both the Kirtland and Nauvoo temples. Vilate was one of the first women to serve in the Nauvoo Temple.
Master Bedroom
Although the home was significantly modified after 1954, this was probably Heber and Vilate’s master bedroom. Vilate was known as a peacemaker who always supported Heber in his many duties. She died in 1867, and he died in 1868 a month after receiving a head injury in a carriage accident.
Master Bedroom
Master Bedroom
Music Room
The fife, drum, and chair in this room actually belonged to William Clayton (1814-1879), who wrote Come, Come, Ye Saints, a cherished hymn for Latter-day Saints.
Nursery
This small room may have been a nursery, as the Kimball’s baby, Brigham, was barely a year old when the family had to leave Nauvoo.
Nursery
Children’s Bedroom
Heber and Vilate had six living children at the time they lived in this home, three of whom had been born in Nauvoo. The couple had ten children in all, with seven living past infancy.
Children’s Bedroom
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